White House adviser says any American undecided about getting vaccinated should 'look at India' 


Any American who is undecided about receiving the coronavirus vaccine should ‘look at India,’ a Biden administration official said on Wednesday.

Andy Slavitt, the White House senior advisor for COVID-19 response, said the general public should compare the downward trends in the U.S. to the spikes seen in the Asian country.

While India recorded its highest single-day death toll on Wednesday, the U.S. recorded a seven-day rolling average of 619 per day, the lowest figure seen since July 6.

‘Look at the data, look at India, and see the results of what happens when you can’t get vaccinated,’ he said on MSNBC.

‘So we’re going to just continue to make it easier and easier for people to one, get the questions answered, and two, take away every inconvenience that would possibly get in the way.’ 

Andy Slavitt, the White House senior advisor for COVID-19 response, said during an appearance on MSNBC on Wednesday (pictured) that any American who has not decided about getting vaccinated yet should look at coronavirus data from India

Andy Slavitt, the White House senior advisor for COVID-19 response, said during an appearance on MSNBC on Wednesday (pictured) that any American who has not decided about getting vaccinated yet should look at coronavirus data from India

India is facing a shortage of COVID-19 vaccines during its deadly second wave, recording its highest single-day death toll of more than 4,200 on Wednesday

India is facing a shortage of COVID-19 vaccines during its deadly second wave, recording its highest single-day death toll of more than 4,200 on Wednesday

Meanwhile, the U.S. has been seeing declining cases and deaths, and recorded on Wednesday a seven-day rolling average of 619, the lowest figure seen since July 6

Meanwhile, the U.S. has been seeing declining cases and deaths, and recorded on Wednesday a seven-day rolling average of 619, the lowest figure seen since July 6

Officials believe a coronavirus variant that first emerged in India is at least partially responsible for the country’s second coronavirus wave.

Known as B.1.617, the variant has become the most common in India, making up an estimated two percent of all cases, according to outbreak.info.

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However, it has three sublineages, one of which accounts for about 20 percent of cases in the country.

B.1.617 has been called a ‘double mutant’ by India’s Ministry of Health because it has two mutations on parts of the virus that help it hook onto our cells. 

On Wednesday, India recorded more than 360,000 new cases and more than 4,200 deaths, the country’s highest single-day death toll.

And, in an odd twist of fate, India is facing a vaccine shortage after making and exporting more vaccines than any other country. 

Slavitt says also recommended that vaccine hesitant people talk to their doctors as well as family and friends people they know who have been vaccinated. 

‘We know that some people make very quick decisions about whether to get a vaccine or not and some people want a little more time to consider whether they should or not,’ he told MSNBC. 

The Indian variant, known as B.1.617, is believed to be partially behind the surge (above) and has been called a 'double mutant' because it has two mutations on parts of the virus that help it hook onto our cells

The Indian variant, known as B.1.617, is believed to be partially behind the surge (above) and has been called a ‘double mutant’ because it has two mutations on parts of the virus that help it hook onto our cells

Slavitt touted several programs rolled out by the White House to meet President Joe Biden's goal of getting 70% of Americans at least one shot by July 4, with 46.2% doing so to date

Slavitt touted several programs rolled out by the White House to meet President Joe Biden’s goal of getting 70% of Americans at least one shot by July 4, with 46.2% doing so to date

‘There’s no right or wrong way to do this. If you have a question you want answered, ask your doctor. If you want to talk to one of the 150 million people who have been vaccinated and see their experience, do that.’

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Slavitt also touted many of the outreach efforts the Biden administration has made in getting people vaccinated.

This includes a number that Americans can text their ZIP code to, GETVAX or 438829, to find appointments and Uber and Lyft offering free rides to and from vaccination sites.

Officials hope the moves will help meet President Joe Biden’s goal of ensuring at least 70 percent of adults get at least one dose by July 4.  

‘We consider this a wartime effort, so, we will absolutely be pouring it on,’ Slavitt said.



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