'Urban coffee lounge vibe’: Browne Jacobson unveils future office vision


National firm Browne Jacobson has replaced desks with open-plan workstations, comfortable seating and soundproofed video conference rooms, in a new blueprint for post-pandemic offices.

The firm is due to move to a new office in Manchester in May, which has been designed as a ‘free-flowing, flexible, working and socialising environment’. The firm has reduced the number of standard desks in favour of open-plan workstations, introduced modern seating such as high stools and armchairs, and built two soundproofed conference rooms with audio visual equipment and specialist lighting.

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The new office will act as a blueprint for Browne Jacobson’s four other UK offices in Birmingham, London, Nottingham and Exeter. It said a survey of its 75-strong Manchester team found that over 90% of staff wanted to work more flexibly after the pandemic has passed, splitting their week between home and the office.

Manchester partner Dai Durbridge, said: ‘We’ve created a bright and vibrant space which perfectly re-creates the urban coffee lounge vibe that our people wished to see. For us a bricks and mortar location plays an important role in helping us to maintain a strong sense of community, culture and brand identity and ensure we offer the kind of working environment our people and clients will be proud to be a part of.’

Amanda Callaghan, partner and head of the Manchester office, added: ‘We have listened very carefully to how our people want to work going forwards and this has enabled us to create a modern office environment that has the perfect mix of social, private and collaborative working spaces befitting a national powerhouse law firm in a post pandemic world.’

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The firm currently occupies floor 14 of No1 Spinningfields, Manchester, and will be officially relocated to floor three in May.



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