Technology

Twitter bans bot spamming users with Wordle spoilers


As of late Monday afternoon, the account was no longer available to view for violating Twitter’s rules. (AFP)

A rogue Twitter bot has been spamming Wordle enthusiasts, posting their daily results, with rude messages and spoilers.

The bot account called @wordlinator replied to people’s Wordle posts with rude messages that included spoilers for the next day’s game. The identity of the bot’s creator is unknown, with the Twitter bio simply reading ‘I was sent from the future to terminate Wordle bragging’. 

The bot not only responded to people’s tweets with spoilers but also included rude messages like ‘get on with your life’, ‘stop bragging’, and ‘this doesn’t make you look smart’.

Wordle, the daily word game, where you get six chances to guess a five-letter word, took Twitter by storm with people sharing the yellow, grey, and green squares depicting their results.

What started out as just a game for the creator’s girlfriend, Wordle had people hooked this month with up to 88K people tweeting about it at one point.

Its popularity stems from the fact that the answer for each day is the same for everyone playing and the game’s interesting sharing format consisting of a series of emoji to let people know how easy or hard it was for you to guess the word of the day. 

After solving the day’s puzzle, players tend to share their results on Twitter which irked some Twitter users.

Given that the game is about guessing one five-letter word, revealing the next day’s word understandably spoils the entire point.

The bot not only responded to people’s tweets with spoilers but also included rude messages. (Credit: Twitter)

While Twitter has not given a reason for pulling the account, Twitter’s Automation Rules page warns against spamming or bothering users by sending them unsolicited messages which the bot clearly did.

How did the bot figure out the next day’s word? 

The identity of the bot’s creator is unknown, with the Twitter bio simply reading ‘I was sent from the future to terminate Wordle bragging’. 

Earlier this month, Robert Reichel succeeded in reverse engineering Wordle to figure out which word it was going to pick for the day.

Not only that, but he was also able to use the algorithm to see what the next day’s word would be. Unfortunately, someone is using his work to spread spoilers over Twitter.

As of late Monday afternoon, the account was no longer available to view, and its page said it was suspended for violating Twitter’s rules.

While bots are permitted on Twitter, according to a 2020 blog post, certain behaviours that ‘undermine and disrupt the public conversation’ are prohibited.

There’s nothing Wordle users hate more than spoilers but looks like they’re safe for now.


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