Ten bottles of wine for the size of four! Flat-pack design more than DOUBLES the number of drinks


Ten bottles of wine for the size of four! Economic flat-pack design more than DOUBLES the number of drinks that can be shipped in a container – and it’s good for the environment too

  • Garçon Wines, based in London, stacks eight bottles vertically and two on top
  • This saves 55 per cent more space and reduces the amount of packaging
  • The invention, launched in Birmingham this week, would cut carbon emissions

Luke Andrews For Mailonline

As many as ten bottles of wine could be sent in the same size box that would fit just four, saving on packaging and protecting the environment.

Eight letterbox-sized bottles containing the standard amount of the grape-based beverage as regular bottles are stacked vertically and horizontally into a unique box

This gives firms 55 per cent more space to work with and halves the number of lorries needed for transport.

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As many as ten bottles of wine could be sent in the same size box that would fit just four, saving on packaging and protecting the environment

As many as ten bottles of wine could be sent in the same size box that would fit just four, saving on packaging and protecting the environment

As many as ten bottles of wine could be sent in the same size box that would fit just four, saving on packaging and protecting the environment

Garcon Wines, based in London, stacks eight of its letterbox-sized bottles horizontally and two vertically to package 10 bottles into the space usually taken up by four bottles 

Garcon Wines, based in London, stacks eight of its letterbox-sized bottles horizontally and two vertically to package 10 bottles into the space usually taken up by four bottles 

Garcon Wines, based in London, stacks eight of its letterbox-sized bottles horizontally and two vertically to package 10 bottles into the space usually taken up by four bottles 

The system is the creation of London-based firm Garçon Wines who launched it Packaging Innovations Birmingham 2019 this week. 

If 50,000 wine bottles are ordered in these boxes, Garcon wine estimates, only two lorries would be needed to transport them, instead of five.

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This would cut carbon emissions and costs by at least 150 per cent, and stop the emission of 9lb 14.7oz, (4.5kg) of CO2 per kilometre into the atmosphere.

The bottles, made from 100 per cent recycled material, are also lighter than a regular bottle producing further fuel savings.

Ten letterbox-sized bottles containing the standard amount of the grape-based beverage as regular bottles are stacked vertically and horizontally into a unique box

Ten letterbox-sized bottles containing the standard amount of the grape-based beverage as regular bottles are stacked vertically and horizontally into a unique box

Ten letterbox-sized bottles containing the standard amount of the grape-based beverage as regular bottles are stacked vertically and horizontally into a unique box

Santiago Navarro, the company’s founder, said current wine transport is ‘inefficient’ and ‘ineffective’ causing ‘unnecessary costly logistics, excessive packaging, wasted resources and a grotesque carbon footprint’.

‘This is because bottles being used are not fit for purpose in a 21st century world of e-commerce, complex supply chains, a global world, and most importantly, climate change.’

The letterbox wine bottle was launched in January 2017 to great interest from customers and consumers.

It is used to transport reds, whites and roses across the country in Birthday hampers, thank you packs or as a gift.

The UK has the sixth largest wine market in the world, consuming 1.5 to 1.8 billion bottles every year.

The market was worth around £6.6 billion in 2017, according to the Wine and Spirit Trade Association.

HOW HAS WINE BEEN STORED HISTORICALLY? 

 6000BC

Wine containers first appear in the historical record 8,000 years ago at a winery in Armenia. Large earthenware containers were found at the site used for storing wines.

3100BC

The Egyptians started making wine from grapes and storing it in amphorae and dolia. The Greeks and later Romans also used these pots to store wine and olive oil.

Amphorae are long-knecked containers with a tip on the underside, while dolia are a large rounded tub capable of storing plenty of wine.

300AD

Oak barrels were also in use around this time in Gaul, modern day France.  They were used to transport and store oil in the same way as amphorae

1600s

Glass wine bottles didn’t start to appear until this time. They were squat with large bases and short necks. By the 1820s, these bottles started to look more like traditional ones that are still in use today.

2000s

Plastic wine bottles began to be used, and the flat-packed wine bottle was invented.

 



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