Pandemic fuels fast food’s appetite for UK expansion


Fast-food chains are gobbling up high street sites left vacant by struggling retail and casual dining operators as they target aggressive expansion in the UK.

Adam Parkinson, European vice-president of the Filipino fried chicken group Jollibee Foods Corp, said the company wanted to be in “every major city in the UK” with plans to invest £30m, including opening 10 new outlets in 2021 and a further 15 to 20 next year.

The first will be a flagship site on Leicester Square in London, which is set to open as lockdown restrictions on restaurants lift in May.

German Doner Kebab claimed to be the UK’s “fastest growing restaurant chain” after it announced plans to open between 47 and 49 new outlets this year, doubling its estate and creating roughly 1,800 jobs.

The group, which launched in Berlin in 1989 but is based in Glasgow, had originally planned to open about 25 UK sites this year but Imran Sayeed, its chief executive, said the pandemic-driven boost in demand for takeaway food had spurred wider expansion. “New communities discovered us during the pandemic [and] that opened up avenues for us to look at some of the territories that we had not been looking at,” he said.

Same-store sales jumped 51 per cent last year compared with 2020 and were already up a further 38 per cent this year, Sayeed added.

Others that have announced plans to open multiple sites this year include “fast pizza” company Fireaway, which intends to double its UK estate to 110 sites, aviation-themed Wingstop, a US fried chicken brand, and the US fast-food chain Wendy’s, which has secured five sites for its return to the UK after it exited the market 20 years ago blaming high rents and operating costs.

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Fast pizza group Fireaway intends to double its UK estate to 110 sites © Alamy

The growth is being fuelled predominantly by overseas chains which see the UK as an attractive market from which to launch a European expansion.

Jollibee also plans to open its first continental European site in Spain this year, while Wendy’s chief executive Todd Penegor said the company planned to “solidify a good beachhead in the UK to really prove out the model for the broader European business”.

Graeme Smith, managing director at consultancy AlixPartners, which advises Burger King UK, said the UK was a popular place for fast-food chains to establish themselves in Europe because of its “proximity to the US market is terms of cultural trends and even simple things like language”.

Thomas Rose, co-founder of property consultancy P-Three, said established brands such as McDonald’s and Burger King were also weighing expansion but were “more sensitive” about publicising their plans as negotiations were continuing with existing landlords over rent while stores had been closed.

The growth of fast-food chains stands in stark contrast to the travails of the wider restaurant sector, which has suffered under a series of government lockdowns that have allowed takeaway food to be sold but ordered dine-in restaurants to close.

Jollibee plans to open 10 new sites this year, with the first a flagship outlet on London’s Leicester Square © Jollibee

One in six casual dining restaurants shut during 2020, according to the industry research firm CGA, as the pandemic hit a sector already struggling with high debts as a result of private equity ownership, over expansion and increasingly steep operating costs. Overall, 3,267 food-led venues closed — equivalent to 63 a week — CGA data showed.

Rose said that the closure of casual dining chains and the administration of several large retailers such as Philip Green’s Arcadia, owner of Topshop, and Paperchase had opened up opportunities for new entrants to the UK’s fast-food market that would not have been possible before, as landlords desperately seek tenants to take up empty high street lots.

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“Fast food was historically excluded from real estate because rents were too high and landlords were more discerning about what brands they chose,” he said.

Parkinson said: “Our prime location is always on the main pedestrianised street on a corner site and they were few and far between pre-Covid but now they are jumping into our laps.”

The rush to expand has in part been driven by significant drops in property prices as the pandemic accelerates consumers’ shift to shop, order food and entertain themselves online.

Rents have fallen as much as 40 per cent in some locations such as London’s Oxford Street but are typically down around 20 to 25 per cent.

Tom Grogan, director of Lemon Pepper Holdings, the franchise owner of Wingstop UK, said the crisis “has allowed us to secure preferential agreements with landlords”.

Sayeed said German Doner Kebab found that demand was driven by teenagers and 20-somethings who were looking for alternative types of fast food: “McDonald’s and Burger King are great brands but people are looking for new things rather than just eating burgers and fried chicken.”



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