Facebook said oversight board is delayed but committed $130 million – News Stories World


Facebook on Thursday announced committing an initial amount of $130 million to form an independent oversight board, but also said that it would not be in a position of announcing board’s members this year as per the original expectations earlier at the time of announcing that plan of forming an oversight board.

Facebook’s said board will be highly empowered with an authority to finally decide whether to display an individual piece of content like sensitive ad or video on the platform or not, and the board could also over rule any decision made by the company’s Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg.

Decision to form an oversight board was made in response to criticism over platform’s approach in assuring transparency and tackling problematic content, and that board is one of the social media giant’s high profile effort related to its internal decision making process, and the platform also released impact of board’s content decision in assessment of human rights issues.

Process of creating the board is now behind the originally planned schedule, Faacebook confirmed in a blog post. The company is expected to decide upon the name of board’s co-chairs and initial members not before the February 2020.

Both unforeseen complications of forming a trust to make independent nature of the board sure and bringing the list of more than 1,000 nominees down to not more than 40, caused the delay, said Brent Harris, Facebook’s head of governance and global affairs.

Referring to the earlier plans of the social media giant, Harris told Reuters by telephone that creating an independent oversight board is not a ‘move fast and break things’ task.

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Harris added that the nomination of more than 1,000 people recommended for the board’s membership is a result of company’s global consultation process in 88 countries as well as its public online portal, opened for the purpose in September this year, those recommendations includes people ranging from Nobel Prize winners to former heads of state and from judges to people from platform’s moderate groups.





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