Covid vaccine calculator reveals when YOU will get your jab – as next phase announced


THIS vaccine calculator reveals when you will get your first coronavirus jab after the next phase of the rollout was announced today.

Millions of jabs have been given to the most vulnerable and scientific advisers have confirmed that the vaccine programme will continue to prioritise people by age after those in their 80s were put at the top of the list.

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Click here to use the online Covid vaccine calculator

Brits across the country have been receiving their vaccine

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Brits across the country have been receiving their vaccineCredit: Rex Features

 

People aged between 40 and 49 will be next in line for the jab, followed by the 30-39s age group and then all those 18 to 29.

Covid jabs are being dished out at a record pace with a new target to reach all adults by July.

The handy vaccine calculator reveals when you will be in line to receive your first and second dose – based on the current seven-day vaccination rate.

In phase 2 of the government’s rollout priority will be given in the following order:

  • All those aged 40-49
  • All those aged 30-39
  • All those aged 18-29

These groups will be vaccinated once all those in phase 1 (the over-50s and most vulnerable) have received a jab.

If the current vaccination rate continues, a 21-year-old could be getting their first dose by May, based on the current uptake of 70 per cent

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If the current vaccination rate continues, a 21-year-old could be getting their first dose by May, based on the current uptake of 70 per cent

So far more than 18.6 million Brits have been given a first dose of either the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab or the Pfizer/BioNTech offering, with over 700,000 having received a second dose.

Currently, just under three million doses are being given a week. More than 340,000 are being given out every day – this is the seven-day average.

The tool uses your age, health and whether you work for the NHS to determine where you are in the queue.

And all other adults who aren’t in the vulnerable category could get their first dose between by June and their second 12 weeks later, based on an uptake of 70 per cent.

The NHS is working its way through a priority list, set out by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

The official prioritisation list, drawn up by the JCVI

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The official prioritisation list, drawn up by the JCVI

There are nine high-priority groups it aims to get through before the general population will get vaccinated.

Vaccines have already been given to the top four groups comprising 15 million people – all over-70s, extremely vulnerable individuals, care home residents and staff and frontline healthcare workers.

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Anyone in these groups who has not received their jab has been urged to contact the NHS to get it.

NHS England said on February 21 that over two thirds of people aged between 65 and 69 have now had their first dose.

Invitations are now being sent to those aged 64 years old.

NHS England medical director, Professor Stephen Powis, said: “Over 14.5 million of the most vulnerable people in England have already safely had their first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine and with people aged between 65 and 69 now eligible too, we want everyone else in this age group to consider making this week your week to get a jab.

“They can – including from later this week anyone aged 64 – use the online national booking service to book in at their nearest Vaccination Centre or pharmacy, so anyone that is able to do so should act this week to seize their opportunity for a life-saving vaccine.”

The aim is to reach everyone over 50 by mid-April, the Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed, an earlier target than the initial “end of April”.

Progress of the jab rollout

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Progress of the jab rollout
Brian Pinker, 82, was the first to receive the Oxford University/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine outside of clinical trials on December 4

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Brian Pinker, 82, was the first to receive the Oxford University/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine outside of clinical trials on December 4Credit: Reuters

Data has suggested that the vaccine rollout is moving at such pace, all over 50s could have their first dose by the end of March.

At least ten areas of England are speeding ahead to vaccinate all over 50s by March 7, figures suggest.

But it’s important to acknowledge the second dose rollout is starting to pick up pace.

The millions who started receiving their first dose per week from mid-January will need their second dose from mid-April onwards.

Asked whether administering second doses will slow down the rate at which first doses can be given, The Prime Minister assured there is enough vaccination supply to get every adult the first dose of the coronavirus jab by the end of July.

Speaking at the Downing Street briefing on Monday, Boris Johnson said: “We’ve got to make sure that we have the supply in place for everybody to get their second vaccination within 12 weeks, as well as giving every adult, as we said already, a vaccination by the end of July.

“We do believe we have the supplies in place to keep up that rhythm and that timetable.

“And we’re looking the whole time to source more where we can from our suppliers according to the contracts that we’ve already signed.”

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He said the UK will support vaccination efforts around the world, adding: “There’s no point in having a vaccination programme that is simply confined to one country, it’s a global pandemic we need a lobal vaccination programme.”

When will you get your vaccine?

Omni’s vaccine queue calculator will estimate for you how many people are ahead of you in the queue to get a Covid vaccine in the UK.

You can also use the calculator that only applies to England, which is more specific.

The tool predicts how long you might have to wait to get your first and then second dose.

All you need to do is enter your age, job and if you have a health condition.

It’s based on the Government’s priority list and the likely rate of vaccination.

It can be adjusted based on how fast the vaccines are deployed – with a speedy operation the key to ending lockdowns.

Omni also sets a default uptake rate of 75 per cent based on previous years’ flu vaccine figures.

In reality, this could be lower or higher, and changing this on the calculator either makes the queue longer or shorter.

In the first four priority groups, there was an uptake of more than 90 per cent.

The tool also takes into consideration that at the moment, the NHS is mostly giving first doses.

But it will soon need to ramp up the administration of second doses, slowing down the speed of the “first-dose rollout”.

Margaret Keenan, 91, the first Briton to receive the Pfizer jab, got her second dose on December 29

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Margaret Keenan, 91, the first Briton to receive the Pfizer jab, got her second dose on December 29Credit: Handout – Getty

With the current vaccination rate and 75 per cent uptake:

Given a vaccination rate of 2,508,384 a week and an uptake of 75%, you should expect to receive your first dose of vaccine between 19/05/2021 and 29/07/2021. You should then get your second dose by between 11/08/2021 and 21/10/2021.

  • A 40-year-old with an underlying health condition:

Given a vaccination rate of 2,508,384 a week and an uptake of 75%, you should expect to receive your first dose of vaccine between 24/02/2021 and 29/03/2021. You should then get your second dose by between 19/05/2021 and 21/06/2021.

Given a vaccination rate of 2,508,384 a week and an uptake of 75%, you should expect to receive your first dose of vaccine between 13/04/2021 and 30/04/2021. You should then get your second dose by between 06/07/2021 and 23/07/2021.

A 40-year-old with a health condition can expect a first dose by the end of March

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A 40-year-old with a health condition can expect a first dose by the end of March

With the current vaccination rate but with 100 per cent uptake:

Given a vaccination rate of 2,508,384 a week and an uptake of 100%, you should expect to receive your first dose of vaccine between 28/06/2021 and 19/09/2021. You should then get your second dose by between 20/09/2021 and 12/12/2021.

  • A 40-year-old with an underling health condition:
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Given a vaccination rate of 2,508,384 a week and an uptake of 100%, you should expect to receive your first dose of vaccine between 06/03/2021 and 21/04/2021. You should then get your second dose by between 29/05/2021 and 14/07/2021.

Given a vaccination rate of 2,508,384 a week and an uptake of 100%, you should expect to receive your first dose of vaccine between 11/05/2021 and 03/06/2021. You should then get your second dose by between 03/08/2021 and 26/08/2021.

The calculator is only a model to give a broad idea of how long you may need to wait for your jab.

Aside from the over-70s, the Government have explained everyone must wait until they are contacted by the NHS, offering them an appointment.

Sir Ian McKellen, 81, gives a thumbs up after having his Covid jab at the Queen Mary University Hospital in London

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Sir Ian McKellen, 81, gives a thumbs up after having his Covid jab at the Queen Mary University Hospital in LondonCredit: � Jeff Moore / eyevine
The NHS vaccine roll-out has begun, but there is a priority list. Pictured: Entertainer Lionel Blair, 92, receives the Pfizer/BioNtech jab at the horse racing course at Epsom, Surrey on December 16

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The NHS vaccine roll-out has begun, but there is a priority list. Pictured: Entertainer Lionel Blair, 92, receives the Pfizer/BioNtech jab at the horse racing course at Epsom, Surrey on December 16Credit: AFP

FIRST PROOF JAB WORKS

It comes after the first evidence the Covid vaccines was published, with experts declaring the results as “very encouraging”.

In the first set of vaccine data published today, researchers in Scotland found the Oxford jab appeared to reduce a person’s risk of hospital admission by up to 94 per cent – four weeks after the initial dose.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh, the University of Strathclyde and Public Health Scotland also examined data on the Pfizer jab.

They found people who received the US vaccine had a reduction in risk of up to 85 per cent between 28 and 34 days after the first dose.

Data for the two jabs combined showed that among people over the age of 80 – who are at high risk of severe disease – the reduction in risk of hospital admission was 81 per cent four weeks after the first dose.

Meanwhile, a separate study from Public Health England has found just a single dose of the Pfizer vaccine cuts the chance of hospital admission and death from Covid by more than 75 per cent among the over-80s.

A separate study found the Pfizer/BioNTech jab also offered a high degree of protection for younger age groups.

It found that healthcare workers who received a single dose of the jab had at least a 70 per cent lower chance of becoming infected with coronavirus 21 days after vaccination, rising to 85 per cent after a second dose.

The Prime Minister Boris Johnson today said in the House of Commons: “No vaccine can ever be 100 percent effective – not every one will take them up and like most viruses Covid-19 will mutate.”

Speaking about the findings at the Downing Street press briefing tonight, England’s Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty said: “These vaccines being used in the UK provide a very substantial level of protection from the first dose. It is very important people get the vaccination. 

“The data suggests that protection continues over a long period beyond 21 days – this is supportive of our delaying the second dose.

“But the third thing it shows is that we must make sure those who have a first vaccine go on to get their second.”

82-year-old man is first person to get dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine

 





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