Coronavirus live news: 'We cannot give up' warns WHO chief; protests flare in Italy










The US supreme court has sided with Republicans to prevent Wisconsin from counting mail-in ballots that are received after election day.

In a 5-3 ruling, the justices on Monday refused to reinstate a lower court order that called for mailed ballots to be counted if they are received up to six days after the 3 November election. A federal appeals court had already put that order on hold.

The ruling awards a victory for Republicans in their crusade against expanding voting rights and access. It also came just moments before the Republican-controlled Senate voted to confirm Amy Coney Barrett, a victory for the right that locks in a conservative majority on the nation’s highest court for years to come.

“As the Covid pandemic rages, the court has failed to adequately protect the nation’s voters,” Justice Elena Kagan wrote in a dissent that noted the state allowed the six-day extension for primary voting in April and that roughly 80,000 ballots were received after the day of the primary election:





China reports 50 new asymptomatic cases, down from 161 day before

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Victoria, Australia records zero new cases for second time

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The UK hotel industry could take four years to return to 2019 levels of business, even if an effective vaccine helps the sector to recover from the deep financial hit caused by Covid 19.

The daily revenue per hotel room – a key indicator for the sector – is not expected to revive to 2019 levels until 2024 in London, and 2023 across the rest of the UK, according to forecasts published on Tuesday by the accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC).

Renewed lockdowns, the decline in foreign tourist numbers and the near disappearance of business travel have left hotels struggling to attract customers, with a dramatic effect on their earnings:





Pope to celebrate Christmas without congregation









Protests flare in Italy





Asian stocks fall amid second wave concerns

Stock markets have opened sharply down in Asia Pacific on Tuesday, taking their cue from the US and Europe where shares fell on Monday amid concerns that the second wave of coronavirus is not being contained. In Sydney the ASX200 has fallen 1.2% and the Dow Jones New Zealand is down 1.3%. Markets in Asia are set to follow suit.

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APAC Opening Calls:#ASX 6100 -0.97%#NIKKEI 23410 -0.32%#HSI 24777 +0.25%#NIFTY 11784 +0.07%#A50 15750 +0.39%#TWSE 12851 -0.42%#IGOpeningCall


October 26, 2020

Michael McCarthy, chief market strategist, CMC Markets and Stockbroking in Sydney, said:

“The challenge for markets is that in most cases they are already pricing a very strong economic bounce. The new outbreaks, and the potential for a double-dip recession, directly contradict this assumption.

Asia Pacific markets are under pressure, with futures markets indicating opening falls for stocks. Trade data released this morning in New Zealand is broadly in line with forecasts, although the trade balance for the year was better than expected. China industrial profits and Hong Kong trade numbers could also shape trading today.





‘We cannot give up’ warns WHO chief





US deaths up 10% in a fortnight

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