Black, Female Tech Startup Creates Digital Safe Space For Minorities – ThomasNet News


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In May, the murder of George Floyd at the hands of police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota, ignited the Black Lives Matter movement like never before — triggering protests not just within the U.S., but around the whole world.

The sudden outpouring of outrage, shock, and support only served to show how woefully ignorant so many people have been about the inequalities, microaggressions, and often outright violence faced by Black people on a daily basis. In the workplace, this translates to substandard leadership, lower pay, and unconscious bias during recruitment and promotion processes.

When Black people, and people from other minority groups, attempt to discuss the discrimination they endure, their experiences are often brushed aside or dismissed. As a result, these employees might be less likely to speak up, which drives further inequalities and feelings of isolation in the workplace.

A startup is working to address this issue by amplifying stories of workplace discrimination and other negative experiences for people of color.

What Is Dipper and How Is It Helping Minority Groups in the Workplace?

Black, female tech entrepreneurs Jacinta C. Mathis and Netta Jenkins founded Dipper in 2019 with the hope of building “a community of professionals of colors who are willing to share their experience, insights, and truth regarding their experience within the workplace.”

Dipper is a digital safe space and community of more than 8000 people. Via the platform, Black people and people of color can anonymously share their workplace experiences, whether positive, negative, or neutral, as well as find advice for navigating equity, diversity, and inclusion in the workplace.

Essentially, when a Black person or a person of color applies for a new role, they can consult the Dipper community to read reviews and ascertain what it will really be like working within that company.

Organizations love to talk the talk when it comes to the PR side of diversity and inclusion. With a platform like Dipper, though, lip service will quickly be called out and leaders will be compelled to implement lasting, meaningful change in response to the everyday experiences of their employees. On the other hand, members can also be directed towards roles at truly inclusive companies.

In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic and the mass layoffs it has caused, a platform like Dipper has never been needed more. This is reflected in the significant uptick of users sharing their reviews in recent months.

During this time, Mathis and Jenkins advise minority professionals to carefully document their negative experiences. It takes a lot of courage, but communicating these experiences as early as possible could help to prevent unreasonable or unlawful layoffs and other forms of mistreatment.

 

Image Credit: wocintechchat.com

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