Beginning of life: NASA unveil breathtaking images of Milky Way giving glimpse into galaxy


Photographing stars and galaxy clusters, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has released the images. Marking the launching of the spacecraft – July 23 1999 – the agency has released the breathtaking images. Within the incredible gallery, Chandra’s images also show an incredible view of Sagittarius A*, a supermassive black hole at the centre of space.

Describing the incredible images, NASA said: “These violent winds can collide or produce shocks in the gas and dust around the stars, depositing large amounts of energy that produce X-ray emission that Chandra can detect.”

The agency also added that they are “clouds of gas at temperatures of millions of degrees, neutron stars and white dwarf stars tearing material from companion stars and beautiful tendrils of radio emission.”

The telescope also combines data from the MeerKAT telescope in South Africa.

Named as one of the “Great Observatories” by NASA, Chandra has taken 2,700 trips around the Earth.

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Chandra’s incredible images come as NASA has also celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

The mission marked a new era for the human race and was widely celebrated around the world.

To mark the event, US President Donald Trump held a service in order to celebrate the launch.

One of the two remaining astronauts, Buzz Aldrin was present at the event as the Kennedy Space Center.

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In a speech to mark the special day: “Sustained exploration that extends from our Earth to the moon and on to the Martian surface will usher in a new era of American ingenuity, drawing untold individuals into the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and defence.”

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The mission commander, Neil Armstrong passed away seven years ago.

The second remaining pilot Michael Collins, however, did not attend the event.

Speaking on the passing of Mr Armstrong, Mr Aldrin said: “His historic step onto the Moon’s surface was the foundation for many of our personal dreams to become astronauts.

“The only thing that outshone his accomplishments was his humility about those accomplishments.

“We will miss him as a friend, mentor, explorer and ambassador for the American spirit of ingenuity.”



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